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07 Dec 2014

What Is Milk Paint?

This information is found directly from Milk Paints Website. I've found information on this paint is a rare find.

Milk Paint is an ancient all-natural paint containing basic ingredients including milk protein (casein), limestone, clay and natural pigments. When absorbed into the surface, Milk Paint will never chip or peel. It is suitable for both interior and exterior applications and is naturally mold resistant. Milk paint provides a completely breathable coating and is ideal for painting wood, plaster, drywall and a variety of other surfaces.  It is environmentally friendly, non-toxic and contains no VOCs.

With the Milk Paint Bonding Agent you can use Milk Paint on even more surfaces such as previously painted walls, varnished surfaces, ceramic tiles, metal, glass etc.  Without the bonding agent, Milk Paint will resist some prefinished or prepainted surfaces to achieve an authentic “chippy” look.

Mix your Milk Paint with 1 1/2 parts water to 1 part Milk Paint.  You can mix it by hand or use a blender for a smoother paint result.  This paint works wonderfully over raw wood and can also adhere to painted and varnished furniture. Without the bonding agent, Milk Paint will resist some prefinished or prepainted surfaces to achieve an authentic “chippy”look. 

Seal and protect using Miss Mustard Seed Furniture Wax, Antique Wax or Hemp Oil.  Annie Sloan Soft Waxes will work as well.

Additional tips on working with Milk Paint…
• Using a blender to mix creates a nicer consistency to work with.  Darker colors like Tricycle and Typewriter can be especially tricky to mix, since they are so highly pigmented.
• When painting a surface that is in high contrast with the paint color (like painting dark wood with a light paint color) multiple coats will be required for an opaque finish.
• Milk paint should be sealed with a top coat like the Furniture Wax or Hemp Oil.
• Use Milk Paint Bond to allow adhesion to previously painted or varnished surfaces.
• Slight shade and color variations may occur between batches. Purchase enough paint to test and finish your entire project. Be sure to save some for future touch ups.
• If you’ve never worked with Milk Paint before, it’s a good idea to try a sample to make sure you like it.

FarmhouseChickenWireCabinet-1

FAQS

What is Milk Paint?
It’s a powdered, all natural paint (no VOC’s) that has been around for thousands of years.  It was found in the pyramids in Egypt and on ancient cave paintings.  It’s been used in America for years on furniture, walls, barns, etc.  It is a versatile paint that can be used to achieve a variety of looks from chippy and distressed to smooth and sleek.

What is the difference between Milk Paint and Chalk Paint®?
They are two totally different kinds of paint.  Chalk Paint® comes premixed in a quart and is great for the adhesive qualities and ability to paint almost any surface without prep work.  Milk Paint comes in a powder form and is mixed with water to turn it into paint.  It has great adhesion when the bonding agent is added directly to the first coat of paint.  Most surfaces do not need to be prepped or require only light sanding.  Without the bonding agent, Milk Paint will resist some (not all) existing finishes (painted or poly finished) in some places and will naturally self-distress, creating the “chippy” look.

What is the Furniture Wax?
The Furniture Wax is used as a protective topcoat.  It’s very similar to other waxes on the market (Annie Sloan Soft Wax, Fiddes), except it’s a little creamier and very low odor.
Apply it to a piece of raw wood, stained wood or painted furniture with a cloth or brush.  Buff after about 5-10 minutes.  Apply additional coats for a higher sheen and more durability.  Coverage for the 7 oz. jar of Miss Mustard Seed Furniture Wax is 400-500 square feet, a little goes a long way.

Is wax a durable finish?
YES, it’s a very durable finish.  If it’s marred, just lightly sand and add another coat of wax.  Refinishing the entire piece is not required. Miss Mustard Seed says she has it on her kitchen table and it has held up beautifully to two young boys!

Can I use the Furniture Wax over other paints or other waxes over Milk Paint?  
Yes, you can use other waxes on Milk Paint and you can use Miss Mustard Seed Furniture Wax on Chalk Paint®, flat latex, stained wood, etc. (You can use Annie Sloan Soft Waxes over Milk Paint.)

Is Milk Paint good for raw wood?
Yes, it’s one of the best paints for raw wood.  It acts like a stain, but looks like a paint.  The color will penetrate the wood for a lasting finish that won’t chip or flake.  This makes it an ideal paint for raw wood cabinets or floors.

What is the Hemp Oil?
Hemp Oil is a finish that is a nice alternative to the wax.  It is all natural, so it’s great for people who are sensitive to chemicals.  Hemp Oil is best when it’s applied to a porous surface (like raw wood, stained wood or Milk Painted raw wood.)  It will absorb into the surface, creating a durable finish.  It can be used over Milk Paint over an old finish as well, though.  Wipe on with a clean cloth, wipe away excess.  Apply additional coats for more shine and durability.  This is also a great product to revive dry, tired wood.

What’s the difference between MMS Antiquing Wax and other “Dark Waxes” on the market?
Miss Mustard Seed Antiquing Wax was developed specifically to be used to antique paint finishes.  Dark waxes are meant to be used as a wood stain/wax in one.  Because of that, the dark wax is very saturated with pigments and can look heavy and streaky on a finish if not mixed with clear wax or mineral spirits.  Antiquing Wax only has a small amount of pigment, so it works more like a glaze with the body of a wax.  This product is also low odor and can be applied with a brush or clean cloth.

Do I have to prime before using Milk Paint?
No.  You can simply apply the bonding agent to the first coat of paint.  That will make the first coat act almost like a colored primer.  You do not need to add the bonding agent to the second coat. If the “chippy” look is desired, do not use the bonding agent and do not prep the piece.  (Watch the video on Getting the “Chippy”)

I actually do not have any personal experience with this paint...YET...but will be back here once I've gotten my hands on it. I'm interested in seeing how it holds up to my fave Chalk Recipe.

Here's a tutorial on a hutch that was done up in Milk Paint...from one of my favorite bloggers. Her blog is filled with tons of great help tips and tutorial of how to do pretty much anything when it comes to refurnishing furniture. It's really an awesome source!

http://salvagedinspirations.com/replace-glass-with-chicken-wire-the-safe-way/

Read 13713 times Last modified on Saturday, 03 January 2015 17:47
Lil Miss

Hi my name is Katie and I have been an artist ever since I was able to pick up a crayon or marker to draw something. I've taken on many roles as an artist and have enjoyed every medium I've touched from hands on painting, to the digital world of graphic design and web development and even had a successful hand-made jewelry business. My most recent venture is restoring old furniture pieces to look new again. To me painting is equivalent of having a day at the spa. I enjoy it that much! I hope you find what we do here inspiring and you come across something  you love!

Website: www.moorerefine.com
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Refined Furnishings & More...

Moore Refine, LLP's online store with a brick and mortar store underway, consist of Reclaimed Furniture (new and old), Home Decore, Specialty Paints and Workshops teaching paint techniques and special craft projects.

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